Gidge – For Seoul

forseoul

Something that claims its percussion uses only rocks and sticks found in the forest makes me want to snort with derision. But there’s something rather sweet about a pair of tunes produced by a couple of Swedes following a trip to South Korea. There’s even a remix from Applescal and a free download.

The forest-botherers Gidge are Jonatan Nilsson and Ludvig Stolterman from Sweden. The whole thing’s avaiable on a name your price basis. For Seoul Pt2 is an ambient piece with disembodied voices and warped tones floating about. A real dreamscape. Pt1 is more of the same but with guitar and crowd noise. The Applescal remix gives the whole thing some beats, which either detracts from the original’s dreaminess and gives it some structure, depending on your point of view. I thought the former on first listen, and the latter on second listen.

And, the free download is from XL8R, who say “a dancefloor-oriented remix of EP track “The Most” from labelmate David Douglas. The slow-burning, jazz-leaning original track is transformed on Douglas rework into a streamlined, bass-driven house cut which moves with just a touch of slow-motion but benefits from plenty of build-and-release tension.” Download.

Blurb: @Gidgeofficial consists of Jonatan Nilsson and Ludvig Stolterman, who were born and raised outside of Umeå, a small city in northern Sweden. Their main source of inspiration is the vast, snow covered woodlands of the North. They have for instance recorded all of their percussions in the forest, using only the sticks and rocks that can be found there. Gidge are currently located in Paris, where they have been developing their live performance for the last six months or so.

’For Seoul’ came about after the duo went on a trip through Asia, and spent a number of days in the South Korean capital. They fell in love with Seoul, and later on created this two-part hymn for the giant city.

Name Your Price for this EP via the Atomnation store: atomnation.bandcamp.com/album/for-seoul

~ by acidted on May 30, 2013.

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