Russian Linesman – The Eysenck Suite II – Choleric

I don’t know about you. But being of a certain age I can only think of ’66 when the phrase “Russian linesman” comes up. Wrong on two counts, as it happens.

First, Russian Linesman is a musical artist from Nottingham. He’s corralled with people like Max Cooper and Appelscal. And that’s a fantastic thing in my book. Have a listen to the YouTube above and you’ll instantly hear why. Ambient IDM of constantly shifting patterns and textures. Restless, with a melody that never quite settles and is impossible to hum along to. The accompanying blurb says “‘The Eysenck Suite II – Choleric’ is the second instalment of this experimental aural jigsaw puzzle and is focused on the Russian Linesman’s musical interpretation of the choleric temperament that is characterised by an anxious and sometimes aggressive temper, resulting in restless behaviour that eventually gives way to periods of impulsive and optimistic activity.” Not sure I can hear the temper in this but it is damn good.

If you want some more, here’s a mini mix of the EP:

And the second thing wrong? That’s the connection between the Russian Linesman and ’66. The linesman was Tofiq Bahramov. He wasn’t Russian, though he was a former Soviet player. He was actually from Azerbaijan. After his death in 1993, Azerbaijan’s then national stadium was renamed the Tofiq Bahramov Stadium in his honour.

Blurb:

The Russian Linesman makes music to capture his feelings and emotions – an audio diary, comprising of analogue sounds fully enclosed in a digital sarcophagus. His new series of releases has already seen a disparate collection of respected DJs and Producers including Max Cooper, Steve Miller (Afterlife), C-Jay (Bedrock), Nemone (BBC 6Music), Samy Birnbach (DJ Morpheus), and Quivver (on John Digweed’s Transitions Radio Show), being incredibly supportive of this enigmatic artist, who has become a somewhat cult figure over the past eleven years, crossing paths with other mavericks such as James Holden, Nathan Fake, Ryan Davis, Applescal and Laurent Garnier, along the way.

The Eysenck Suites I-IV explore the psychology of Hans Eysenck’s four temperamental categories and the emotions they encompass, a project that the British Psychological Society have already endorsed in their recent review of ‘Suite I’ here: thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/finding-mel…lic-balance.

‘The Eysenck Suite II – Choleric’ is the next instalment of this experimental aural jigsaw puzzle and is focused on the Russian Linesman’s musical interpretation of the choleric temperament that is characterised by an anxious and sometimes aggressive temper, resulting in restless behaviour that eventually gives way to periods of impulsive and optimistic activity. As a visual reference point, the Linesman has selected one of his travelogue photographs taken at an abandoned communist prison in Tallinn (Estonia) as the artwork for this release. This EP is not intended to be a comforting listening experience.

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~ by acidted on May 30, 2017.

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